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DPDK vs SR-IOV for NFV? – Why a wrong decision can impact performance!

It is not easy to settle the debate for DPDK vs SR-IOV-the technologies used to optimize packet processing in NFV servers.

For one, you will find supporters on both sides with their claims and arguments.

However although both are used to increase the packet processing performance in servers, the decision on which one is better comes down to design rather than the technologies themselves.

So a wrong decision on DPDK vs SR-IOV can really impact the throughput performance as you will see towards the conclusion of the article.

To understand why design matters, it is a must to understand the technologies, starting from how Linux processes packets.

In particular, this article attempts to answer the following questions!

  1. What is DPDK
  2. What is SR-IOV
  3. How DPDK is different than SR-IOV
  4. What are the right use cases for both and how to position them properly?
  5. How DPDK/SR-IOV affects throughput performance.

I recommend that you start from the beginning until the end in order to understand the conclusion in a better way.

What is DPDK?

DPDK stands for Data Plane Development Kit.

In order to understand DPDK , we should know how Linux handles the networking part

By default Linux uses kernel to process packets, this puts pressure on kernel to process packets faster as the NICs (Network Interface Card) speeds are increasing at fast.

There have been many techniques to bypass kernel to achieve packet efficiency. This involves processing packets in the userspace instead of kernel space. DPDK is one such technology.

User space versus kernel space in Linux?
Kernel space is where the kernel (i.e., the core of the operating system) runs and provides its services.  It sets things up so separate user processes see and manipulate only their own memory space.
User space is that portion of system memory in which user processes run . Kernel space can be accessed by user processes only through the use of system calls.

Let’s see how Linux networking uses kernel space:

Linux Networking stack with and without DPDK-DPDK Tutorial

For normal packet processing, packets from NIC are pushed to Linux kernel before reaching the application.

However, the introduction of DPDK (Data Plane Developer Kit), changes the landscape, as the application can talk directly to the NIC completely bypassing the Linux kernel.

Indeed fast switching, isn’t it?

Without DPDK, packet processing is through the kernel network stack which is interrupt-driven. Each time NIC receives incoming packets, there is a kernel interrupt to process the packets and a context switch from kernel space to user space. This creates delay.

With the DPDK, there is no need for interrupts, as the processing happens in user space using Poll mode drivers. These poll mode drivers can poll data directly from NIC, thus provide fast switching by completely bypassing kernel space. This improves the throughput rate of data.

DPDK with OVS

Now after we know the basics of how Linux networking stack works and what is the role of DPDK, we turn our attention on how OVS (Open vSwitch ) works with and without DPDK.

What is OVS (Open vSwitch)?
Open vSwitch is a production quality, multilayer virtual switch licensed under the open source Apache 2.0 license. This runs as software in hypervisor and enables virtual networking of Virtual Machines.
Main components include:
Forwarding path: Datapath/Forwarding path is the main packet forwarding module of OVS, implemented in kernel space for high performance
Vswitchid is the main Open vSwitch userspace program

An OVS is shown as part of the VNF implementation. OVS sits in the hypervisor. Traffic can easily transfer from one VNF to another VNF through the OVS as shown

In fact, OVS was never designed to work in the telco workloads of NFV. The traditional web applications are not throughput intensive and OVS can get away with it.

Now let’s try to dig deeper into how OVS processes traffic.

OVS, no matter how good it is, faces the same problem as the Linux networking stack discussed earlier. The forwarding plane of OVS is part of the kernel as shown below, therefore a potential bottleneck as the throughput speed increases.

Open vSwitch can be combined with DPDK for better performance, resulting in a DPDK-accelerated OVS (OVS+DPDK). The goal is to replace the standard OVS kernel forwarding path with a DPDK-based forwarding path, creating a user-space vSwitch on the host, which uses DPDK internally for its packet forwarding. This increases the performance of OVS switch as it is entirely running in user space as shown below.

OVS with DPDK , OVS without DPDK

DPDK ( OVS + VNF)

It is also possible to run DPDK in VNF instead of OVS. Here the application is taking advantage of DPDK, instead of standard Linux networking stack as described in the first section.

This image has an empty alt attribute; its file name is image-3.png

While this implementation can be combined with DPDK in OVS but this is another level of optimization. However, both are not dependent on one another and one can be implemented without the other.

SR-IOV

SR-IOV stands for “Single Root I/O Virtualization”. This takes the performance of the compute hardware to the next level.

The trick here is to avoid hypervisor altogether and have VNF access NIC directly, thus enabling almost line throughput.

But to understand this concept properly, let’s introduce an intermediate step, where hypervisor pass- through is possible even without using SR-IOV.

This is called PCI pass through. It is possible to present a complete NIC to the guest OS without using a hypervisor. The VM thinks that it is directly connected to NIC. As shown here there are two NIC cards and two of the VNFs, each has exclusive access to one of the NIC cards.

However the downside: As the two NICs below are occupied exclusively by the VNF1 and VNF3. And there is no third dedicated NIC, the VNF2 below is left without any access.

PCI Pass through

SR-IOV solves exactly this issue:

The SR-IOV specification defines a standardized mechanism to virtualize PCIe devices.  This mechanism can virtualize a single PCIe Ethernet controller to appear as multiple PCIe devices.

By creating virtual slices of PCIe devices, each virtual slice can be assigned to a single VM/VNF thereby eliminating the issue that happened because of limited NICs

Multiple Virtual Functions ( VFs) are created on a shared NIC. These virtual slices are created and presented to the VNFs.

(The PF stands for Physical function, This is the physical function that supports SR-IOV)

SR-IOV Tutorial

This can be further coupled with DPDK as part of VNF, thus taking combined advantage of DPDK and SR-IOV.

When to use DPDK and/or SR-IOV

The earlier discussion shows two clear cases. One using a pure DPDK solution without SR-IOV and the other based on SR-IOV. ( while there could be a mix of two in which SR-IOV can be combined with DPDK) The earlier uses OVS and the later does not need OVS. For understanding the positioning of DPDK vs SR-IOV, we will use just these two cases.

DPDK and SR-IOV, which one is better

On the face of it, it may appear that SR-IOV is a better solution as it uses hardware-based switching and not constrained by the OVS that is a purely software-based solution. However, this is not as simple as that.

To understand there positioning, we should understand what is East-West vs North-South traffic in Datacenters.

There is a good study done by intel on DPDK vs SR-IOV; they found out two different scenarios where one is better than the other.

if Traffic is East-West, DPDK wins against SR-IOV

In a situation where the traffic is East-West within the same server ( and I repeat same server), DPDK wins against SR-IOV. The situation is shown in the diagram below.

This is clear from this test report of Intel study as shown below the throughput comparison

DPDK vs SR-IOV

It is very simple to understand this: If traffic is routed/switched within the server and not going to the NIC. There is NO advantage of bringing SR-IOV. Rather SR-IOV can become a bottle neck ( Traffic path can become long and NIC resources utilized) so better to route the traffic within the server using DPDK.

If traffic is North-South, SR-IOV wins against DPDK

In a scenario where traffic in North-South ( also including traffic that is East-West but from one server to another server ), SR-IOV wins against DPDK. The correct label for this scenario would be the traffic going from one server to another server.

The following report from the Intel test report clearly shows that SR-IOV throughput wins in such case

DPDK vs SR-IOV

It is also easy to interpret this as the traffic has to pass through the NIC anyway so why involve DPDK based OVS and create more bottlenecks. SR-IOV is a much better solution here

Conclusion with an Example

So lets summarize DPDK vs SR-IOV discussion

I will make it very easy. If traffic is switched within a server ( VNFs are within the server), DPDK is better. If traffic is switched from one server to another server, SR-IOV performs better.

It is apparent thus that you should know your design and traffic flow. Making a wrong decision would definitely impact the performance in terms of low throughput as the graphs above show.

So let say you have a service chaining application for microservices within one server, DPDK is the solution for you. On the other hand, if you have a service chaining service, where applications reside on different servers, SR-IOV should be your selection. But don’t forget that you can always combine SR-IOV with DPDK in VNF ( not the DPDK in OVS case as explained above) to further optimize the SR-IOV based design.

What’s your opinion here. Leave a comment below?

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Aman Kaushik
Aman Kaushik
2 years ago

Excellent Comparison & great insight of NFV performance challenges. Thanks.

Saroj Panda
Saroj Panda
2 years ago
Reply to  Aman Kaushik

Excellent write up. Thanks Faisal.

Can you also share few successful deployments

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Saroj Panda

Thanks Saroj, I am afraid I dont have any public info about deployments

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Aman Kaushik

Thanks Aman ! Glad that you liked it

Christopher Adigun
Christopher Adigun
2 years ago

This is a concise explanation.. I have a question, is it possible to combine DPDK and SR-IOV in way that traffic between VNFs within a server use OVS+DPDK while traffic between a VNF and outside is routed via SR-IOV directly? In other words maybe there can be a process that decides when to use OVS+DPDK or SR-IOV (i.e. if you have a capable NIC that supports SR-IOV)

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago

Interesting Comment Christopher !, I am not aware of this kind of implementation. Yet this would be interesting to have to get the best of both worlds

Thomas Monjalon
Thomas Monjalon
7 months ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

You can have both paravirtualization and SR-IOV interfaces in the VNF. You just need to route to the best interface depending your traffic is East-West or North-South.
Even better: the VNF can be a DPDK application: all types of interfaces are supported in DPDK, and there are some routing libraries.

Askar
Askar
2 years ago

That was brilliant articel Faisal. Thanks.
It appears to me that still there are a lot of details on NFV true implementation challenges that need to be discussed. Thank you for opening this topic.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Askar

Thanks Askar for stopping by to read my blog

Adrie T
Adrie T
2 years ago

I just know that there is an implementation of DPDK in VNF for optimizing the VNF in accessing the virtual network layer. Is this using the same DPDK kit or there is another DPDK for this purpose?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Adrie T

Thanks for commenting. Yes, this is the same DPDK used in VNF. But as the article shows that DPDK can be implemented in OVS as well as VNF…

David Korman
2 years ago

A very good comparison and source of information.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  David Korman

Thanks David, Glad that you liked it

Harish Shah
Harish Shah
2 years ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

A very good read. Thanks for explaining it so nicely.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Harish Shah

Thanks Harish, Glad that you liked it

Karun
Karun
2 years ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

Amazing explanation and presentation in simple way to understand easily
sir, if you may post something on below topics
1. L3VPN
2. L2Gw
3. VxLAN
4. overlay and underlay
5. GRE
all in respect of current use into virtual data centers.

karun
karun
2 years ago
Reply to  Karun

in addition
SD WAN
and orchestration

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Karun

Thanks Karun for stopping by to read my blog. I will consider your feedback for future blogs….

Kranthi
Kranthi
2 years ago

Nice comparison. Very helpful.
Request to provide more scenarios on OVS-DPDK, where you use it in real time.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Kranthi

Thank you Kranthi for your comments !

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Kranthi

Thanks Kranthi, I am not sure if I got your question correctly..

Priyesh
Priyesh
2 years ago

Nice and simple explanation. Thanks for sharing 🙂

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Priyesh

Thank you Priyesh for visiting and commenting

javed
javed
2 years ago

Thanks, very informative

Hossam Abdelmoniem
Hossam Abdelmoniem
2 years ago

Thanks a lot, Well described and explained.

Very very informative article!

Samir Dixit
Samir Dixit
2 years ago

Detailed and yet simple to understand.
A must read for beginners in networking enthusiast

Shubhra Srivastav
Shubhra Srivastav
2 years ago

Excellent explanation, Faisal. Thank you! Can you comment on the limitations of SW based DPDK and SRIOV in terms of performance and latency and how using an accelerator (FPGA) can improve both of those.

Luciano
Luciano
2 years ago

The best article I’ve ever seen about DPDK and SR-IOV. Thanks !

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Luciano

Hi Luciano, thank you…you made my day 🙂

Kunal
Kunal
2 years ago

Great Explanation.

Would it be possible to include VPP as well?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Kunal

Thanks Kunal and for your inputs too

Mohit
Mohit
2 years ago

Thanks Faisal for educating others in a very simplified way!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Mohit

Thanks Mohit for your feedback

Satyam Kumar
Satyam Kumar
2 years ago

Excellent explanation.You made my day .Need some more !!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Satyam Kumar

and you made my day 🙂 …thanks Satyam

Jeff Tantsura
Jeff Tantsura
2 years ago

Thanks for great article!
I think workload mobility and implications of SR-IOV for such cases should be included in the overview.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Jeff Tantsura

Thanks for your feedback Jeff Tantsura

budiharto
budiharto
2 years ago

thanks for the article, very informative. for real NE in telco, it most likely will need to use SR-IOV for high throughput reason and surely it will sit on top of multeple hosts/phy servers (for redundancies and capacity), but it comes with the cost: it not easy to do “live” migration without interrupting the service and less flexible as it require special mapping to phy NIC (compared to OVS).
the logical choice will be limit SRIOV for telco “NE” and OVS for the rest (EMS, management etc.)

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  budiharto

Agreed Budiharto

Sam Gad
Sam Gad
2 years ago

Never seen anyone explain it better. thank you so much

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Sam Gad

Thanks Sam, glad that you liked it

SANDEEP
SANDEEP
2 years ago

Another great article Faisal!!!
A unique blend of story telling combined with technology enlightment.
I am hooked to your articles.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  SANDEEP

Thank you so much Sandeep

sorfaraz
sorfaraz
2 years ago

Is there any relationship here with SDN enable network?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  sorfaraz

Salam Sorfaraz, the behaviour should be same irrespective of the use of SDN or not.

Jayaprakash reddy(Jp)
Jayaprakash reddy(Jp)
2 years ago

Really very useful and informative article with clear explanation and logical diagrams. Thanks

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago

Thanks a lot Jayaprakash ! glad that it was of help to you

Ashwani
Ashwani
2 years ago

This is one of the simplest explanation of such a complex topic that I have seen till now. This article is like a treasure for me. I am thankful to you that you have published it to educate others.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Ashwani

Dear Ashwani, Thanks a lot. This is very encouraging comment for me….please spread the good and share the article to your circle…

Akmal
Akmal
2 years ago

Excellent review in a very simply and logical steps. Thank you for the great efforts

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Akmal

Thanks Akmal, Glad that you stopped by and liked this piece.

Arvind Kumar
Arvind Kumar
2 years ago

You have dealt with a complex topic in the best possible simple way. Really amazed by your capability to explain things in such a simple manner.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Arvind Kumar

Thanks Arvind for stopping by to read the blog…

Eslam Seweilam
Eslam Seweilam
2 years ago

Very Informative Article , Thanks Faisal!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Eslam Seweilam

Thanks Eslam for stopping by to read this piece.

Arvind
Arvind
2 years ago

Excellent post Faisal. You really simplified it for me. My team is in the process of implementing SR-IOV vs DPDK for a Telco and this is the kind of information I needed to understand the concepts better.
I will probably come back in a few months with some practical view point that I can add from our field experience.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  Arvind

Wow that will be wonderful to get the practical viewpoint

Rakesh Shrivastava
Rakesh Shrivastava
2 years ago

Very very neatly explained Faisal. Good work !

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago

Great to have you here Rakesh !

duy nguyen
duy nguyen
2 years ago

Good morning FAISAL KHAN,
This article very clear and easy to understand. Can I translate and add some more info this article to Vietnamese before share to my Colleages?
Original link will be keep at heading of my article.
Thanks you!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago
Reply to  duy nguyen

thanks duy, answered through mail

Karun
Karun
2 years ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

sir, for me vnf and nfv is quite confusing and hardly can differentiate these two, can you please add some detail to differential both

Thuan T. Nguyen
Thuan T. Nguyen
2 years ago

This post does open my mind. But it is so good if we can show steps to be practical. To see and trust.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
2 years ago

Thanks Thuan, can you elaborate a little bit

Neetesh
Neetesh
1 year ago

Excellent Article !!!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Neetesh

Thanks Neetesh

Sandeep
Sandeep
1 year ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

Really, explained in very easy format.
really helpful

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Sandeep

Sandeep, thanks for visiting and liking it.

simiter
simiter
1 year ago

good report!!
In “If traffic is North-South, SR-IOV wins against DPDK”, who dicide the route to VNF2?
To controll the route to VNF1,3, OVS-like Switch is nessesary. Outer switch?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  simiter

Sorry Simiter, not able to get you !

sandeep sharma
sandeep sharma
1 year ago

Really very well explained. good article.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  sandeep sharma

Thanks Sandeep, good that you liked it

Ajay Kumar
Ajay Kumar
1 year ago

great explination ..excellent 🙂

Many thanks…

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Ajay Kumar

Thanks Ajay for stopping by to read and liking it.

Zahid
Zahid
1 year ago

Faisal, indeed a great way and simplified one to explain the complex topics together.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Zahid

Zahid, great to know that you liked it

Jessica
Jessica
1 year ago

“If You Can’t Explain it Simply, You Don’t Understand it Yourself”
Excellent Description. Thanks,

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Jessica

Thanks a lot Jessica

Latha Sunkara
Latha Sunkara
1 year ago
Reply to  Jessica

Really explained very well and any one can understand it. Keep posting more and more pls. to educate rest of the world. Rarely seen such detailed write-ups.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Latha Sunkara

Thanks Latha for taking to read and commenting.Glad that you liked it

naga
naga
1 year ago

Excellent Sir !!

please share the DPDK and SR-IOV commands for regular operations and debug ?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  naga

Thanks Naga ! I am not sure, can you clarify further

sunil singh
sunil singh
1 year ago

simple and superb, as i am fresher to this technology still
grasped the essence!!
Thanks a Lot!!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  sunil singh

Thank you so much Sunil, you made my day 🙂

Simon Chapman
Simon Chapman
1 year ago

nicely explained.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Simon Chapman

Thanks Simon

Anand
Anand
1 year ago

Hi,

Brilliant explanation! Its simple and precise.
As you explained in DPDK, kernel is bypassed and userspace polls for the packets. Are you aware of Enhanced Network Stack of VMware? It is a DPDK based stack in which the kernel itself does the polling.
Do you think it will be a better solution for telcos? Better than simple DPDK or SRIOV?

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Anand

Hi Anand, thanks for commenting. I am not aware of VMWare stack, I will have to check it up.

Jatin
Jatin
1 year ago

Thanks Faisal for making the Complex topic so Simple. Kudos to you.
How about next blog on VPP ?

Thanks.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Jatin

Sounds like a good idea ! Thanks Jatin for suggesting.

Syed Asfar
Syed Asfar
1 year ago

appreciate this topic explanation.

indeed very helpful.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Syed Asfar

Thanks Syed asfar, for taking time to read and liking it.

Saif
1 year ago

Thanks, Faisal for this excellent write-up. This was really helpful.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Saif

Thanks Saif, Glad that you liked it

Ajay
Ajay
1 year ago

can you please correct the typo “DPDK stands for Data Plan Development Kit”.
it is awesome to see how simplified your contents are even though the topic are complex .thumbs up !!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Ajay

Good feedback Ajay, this post guests hundreds of visitors every day, you are the first one to point it out.

Amarinder
Amarinder
1 year ago

Thanks Faisal, So easy to understand your write up on complex technologies

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Amarinder

Thanks Amarinder

Saurabh Mishra
Saurabh Mishra
1 year ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

Very nice explanation .. Awesome Job Faisal

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Saurabh Mishra

Thanks Saurabh, Glad that you liked it

KELING JI
KELING JI
1 year ago

very very good article , but some pic can not be found , could you please to fix it ? many thanks

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  KELING JI

Thanks, keling, Can you clarify, as everything is visible at my end. which browser you are using, can you change it.

chandra
chandra
1 year ago

Wow…Amazing explanation… right on target…So difficulty subject but you made it so easy…well done

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  chandra

Glad that you liked it Chandra, keep visiting back !

Eduardo
Eduardo
1 year ago

Very well explained Faisal, thank you!

I have a little doubt, however. As you explained, with SR-IOV the VM can already talk directly to the server NIC (using a VF). What does DPDK provide for in a SR-IOV+DPDK scenario?

Cheers!

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Eduardo

Hi Eduardo, thanks for your question. Some applications are customized for DPDK ( does not necessarily mean they have to use OVS for switching ), they can still be used with SR-IOV, thus taking advantage of SR-IOV fast switching.

rahul
rahul
1 year ago

great work!! excellent

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  rahul

Thanks Rahul, its nice to see that you liked it.

Ranjeet
Ranjeet
1 year ago

Awesome for any new learner . Basic to deep explanation. Very simple way feeding full meal.

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Ranjeet

Hello Ranjeet, glad that you liked it.

Ishrat Gul
Ishrat Gul
1 year ago

Wonderful comparison , thanks for knowledge sharing

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Ishrat Gul

Thanks Ishrat, Glad that you liked it.

Ashok
1 year ago

Hi,

Very nice explanation thanks.
I see in the DPDK diagram, OVS is included in your explanation but not in SR-IOV.
Is the OVS required for switching traffic? How do you explain that?

Thanks

Faisal Khan
Faisal Khan
1 year ago
Reply to  Ashok

you are correct Ashok, not needed in case of SR-IOV, but needed for DPDK for switching traffic.

Ashok Meti
Ashok Meti
7 months ago
Reply to  Faisal Khan

Can that be corrected from the diagram now? That adds more clarity.

Thanks

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